Old Dominion University
A to Z Index  |  Directories


College of Sciences


Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences




OEAS Undergraduate Courses

  • 106N-107N.  Introductory Oceanography.
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits each semester.  106N is prerequisite to 107N.  106N emphasizes geology and chemistry covering the formation and constitution of the earth and the ocean basins.  107N emphasizes physics and biology including meteorology, waves, tides, currents and life in the sea.  Laboratory emphasizes practice of basic scientific methods.  Knowledge of the metric system, scientific notation, ratio and proportion, and graphing is required.  Field trip and research vessel cruise are required.

  • 110N-112N.  Earth Science-Historical Geology.
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits each semester.  110N is an introductory course in geological sciences.. The course relates the principles of natural science to Earth as a planet, its resources, and its environment.  The effects of geologic processes on the environment are stressed. 110N or 111N is a prerequisite for 112N. In 112N, evolution of the continents, ocean basins, mountain chains, and the major life forms throughout Earth's history are studied chronologically and are related to the physical and biological changes which have caused them.  A student receiving credit for 111N cannot receive credit for 110N.

  • 111N-112N.  Physical Geology-Historical Geology.
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits each semester.  111N introduces the student to the study of the materials, structures, and processes of the Earth.  Present terrestrial resources are interpreted in terms of the internal and surface processes that formed them. 110N or 111N is a prerequisite for 112N. In 112N, evolution of the continents, ocean basins, mountain chains, and the major life forms throughout Earth's history are studied chronologically and are related to the physical and biological changes which have caused them.  A student receiving credit for 111N cannot receive credit for 110N.

  • 122K.  Dinosaurs and Evolution.
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  An introductory course in geological sciences.  Course topics include the development and characteristics of major groups of dinosaurs; the nature of the geologic and paleontologic record; and processes of evolution and extinction throughout geological time.  Students will also discuss the philosophical impact of the discovery of fossils and evolution.

  • 126N-127N.  Honors:  Introductory Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits each semester.  126N is prerequisite to 127N.  Open only to students in the Honors College.  Special honors section of OEAS 106N-107N.  In addition to broad coverage of the geology, chemistry, physics and biology of the ocean, students will read scientific papers with current environmental problems.  There will be several field trips to nearby ecosystems.

  • OEAS 195-196. Topics. 1 credit.

  • 210.  Environmental Earth Science.
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits.  Dynamic processes of the land, ocean, and atmosphere and how they affect people.  Topics include plate tectonics; rocks and minerals; soil and water; weather and climate; tides and currents; limits to natural resources.  OEAS 210 is a required course for the IDS program in Early Childhood Education.

  • 302K.  Environmental Geology.
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: junior standing and an 8-hour sequence in a General Education science course.  Geologic resources and processes that limit human activities and pose significant hazards.  Does not satisfy OEAS major degree requirements.

  •  303.  Paleontology. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite:  OEAS 112N.  Concepts of paleontology and application of paleontological data to problems in other scientific fields are discussed.  Major invertebrate phyla represented in the fossil record are studied.  Laboratory work includes preparation techniques and study of representative examples of important fossil types.

  • 306.  Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: BIOL 115N, CHEM 115N, MATH 211, and OEAS 111N, and PYS111N or 231N.  General survey of physical, geological, chemical and biological oceanography.  The application of skills from mathematics, geology, physics, biology and chemistry for the solution of oceanographic problems.

  • 310.  Global Earth Systems. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: BIOL 115N, CHEM 115N, MATH 211, and OEAS 111N.  Core course for ocean and earth sciences majors that examines the processes linking the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere into an interactive system. 

  • 313.  Mineralogy. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 115N.  Corequisite:  PHYS 111N or 231N.  The concepts of mineralogy are developed on the basics of geometrical, crystallographic, chemical bonding, crystal structures, and physical and optical properties.  Mineral associations and genesis will be emphasized.  Laboratory exercises include mineral identification by physical and optical properties, X-ray diffraction, and crystal form.

  • 314.  Petrology. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  OEAS 313.  The study of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic petrology is developed using the concepts of crystal growth, phase equilibria, mineral associations, and composition of the Earth's crust and mantle.  Laboratory exercises include hand specimen,  microscopic, and X-ray diffraction identification and origin of rocks.

  • 320.  Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 4 credits.  Prerequisite: OEAS 110N or 111N.  The origin, transport, and deposition of sediments with emphasis on interpretation of sediment sequences and principles and methods of correlation.  Laboratory exercises involve field sampling, textural analyses, and sedimentary structures.  Field trip required. 

  • 344W.  Geomorphology. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: OEAS 112N, 314 or 320  and either ENGL 111C, 126C, or 131C or permission of instructor.  Geologic processes that shape the earth's surface.  Laboratory studies involve interpretation of topographic maps, soil maps, and aerial photographs.  Field trip required.
      
  •  367.  Cooperative Education. 
    1-3 credits.  Prerequisites:  junior standing and permission of the department.  Available for pass/fail grading only.  Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Career Management program prior to the semester in which the experience is to take place.  (qualifies as a CAP experience)

  • 368.  Internship in Ocean and Earth Sciences.  
    1-3 credits.  Prerequisites:  junior standing, permission of department and a 3.00 grade point average.  Available for pass/fail grading only.  Students gain on the job work experience related to their undergraduate curriculum.  (qualifies as a CAP experience)

     
  • 369.  Practicum.  1-3 credits.  Prerequisite:  junior standing, permission of department and must have declared ocean and earth sciences major or minor.  (qualifies as a CAP experience)

  •  395.  Selected Topics.  Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: completion of 8 hours of a laboratory science.  A nonmathematical course based on topics such as urban geology, urban biometeorology, and intelligent life in the universe.  Specific topics will be announced each semester.

  • 402/502.  Field Experiences in Oceanography for Teachers. 
    Lecture 2 hours; field experience 2 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites:  background in K-12 Education.  Field and laboratory experiences in oceanography including hands-on experience using equipment and methods suitable for middle and secondary education professionals.  Course will provide understanding of oceanic processes using simple field and laboratory experiments.  Not available for credit for OEAS majors.

  • 403W/503.  Aquatic Pollution. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: at least two semesters of one of the following:  BIOL 115N-116N, CHEM 115N-116N, OEAS 111N-112N, PHYS 111N-112N, OEAS 106N-107N or 126N-127N.  This course will present basic ecological principles relevant to water pollution and toxicology.  Topics will cover runoff, eutrophication, sewage treatment, industrial waste, oil pollution, pesticides, and plastics in the sea.  Case studies provide focal points for consideration of issues in making decisions and setting policy.

  • 404/504.  Environmental Physiology of Marine Animals.  
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  OEAS 306 or BIOL 331.  Functional morphology and physiological aspects of growth and ecological energetics of marine animals.  Basic concepts and habitat comparisons.

  • 405/505.  Physical Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: MATH 211 and either PHYS 231N-232N or two semesters of hydraulics.  Physics of the ocean: properties of seawater and their distribution; water mass formation; mass and energy flows; waves; tides; models; estuarine and coastal processes.  An elective for science and engineering majors.

  • 408/508.  Introductory Soils. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Prerequisites:  CHEM 115N-116N.  Nature and properties of soils.  Physical and chemical processes in soils and their influence on plant growth, the movement of water, and pollutants.  Importance of soil properties in determining urban, industrial and agricultural uses.

  • 410/510.  Chemical Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 4 credits.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 115N-116N, OEAS 306 or consent of instructor.  Chemical composition of the ocean and the chemical, biological, geological and physical processes controlling it. Laboratory experiments include determination of salinity, oxygen, and nutrients, and a field sampling trip is undertaken.

  • 411/511.  Structural Geology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Prerequisite:  OEAS 320 or permission of instructor.  Recognition, habitat, and origin  of deformed geologic structures.  Relationships between structural patterns and tectonic settings. Laboratory sessions emphasize cartographic and stereographic projections, map interpretation, and hand sample evaluation. Weekend field trip required. 

  • 412/512.  Global Environmental Change. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: OEAS 306 and 310.  An examination of the development of the earth as a habitable planet, from its origin to human impacts on global biogeochemical cycles on land, and in the oceans and atmosphere.

  • 413/513.  Geochemistry. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites:  CHEM 115N-116N and OEAS 313.  Low temperature geochemistry of surface and near-surface materials and processes.  Weathering and the geochemical cycle as influenced by environment.

  • 414/514.  Coastal Landscape and Ecology. 
    Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 4 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: OEAS 306 and 310.  Principles of coastal landscape formation based on classical and modern theories.  Geotechnical characteristics and plant habitats at elements of coastal landscapes.  Field trips.

     
  • 415/515.  Waves and Tides. 

    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites:  MATH 205-206 and PHYS 111N-112N or 231N-232N or permission of the instructor.  Causes, nature, measurement and analysis of water waves and tides.  Mathematical and graphical application to wave and tide problems.

  • 418/518.  Chemical Limnology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  OEAS 306.  Chemical cycling in lakes and reservoirs, and interactions with biological and physical processes; quantitative modeling of lake geochemistry.

     
  •  419/519.  Spatial Analysis of Coastal Environments.  
    Lecture 1.5 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: OEAS 414/514 and GEOG 404/504.  The course integrates remotely sensed and field techniques for scientific investigation and practical management of coastal environmental systems.  Spatial modeling of coastal processes and management tools using geographic information system (GIS).

  • 420/520.  Hydrogeology.  
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites:  OEAS 320, MATH 211, PHYS 111N-112N or 231N-232N, or permission of the instructor.  Topics covered will include the occurrence and movement of surface and subsurface water, the nature and distribution of permeable rocks and strata, field techniques used in ground-water studies, and the flow of ground-water to wells.

  • 426/526.  Concepts in Oceanography for Teachers. 
    3 credits.   Prerequisite:  junior standing or permission of the instructor.  This web-based course will provide a practical introduction to oceanography for earth science teachers.  It is particularly aimed at current science teachers attempting to become certified in earth science education.  Topics will include discussions of geological, biological, physical and chemical oceanography.  Not available for credit for OEAS majors.
  • 430/530. Introduction to Geophysics. Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: OEAS 111N, Math 211, and Phys 11N/112N or 231N/232N. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 112N or 232N.  Introduction to the physics of the earth, including plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, and seismology, gravity, the earth's magnetic field, geophysical remote sensing, and mantle convection.
  • 431/531.  Sedimentary Petrology. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite:  OEAS 320.  The chemical aspects of sediments and sedimentary rock needed for modern geologic and oceanographic studies.  Optical petrology and x-ray diffraction are emphasized in the laboratory with particular attention to clay mineralogy. Field trip required.

  • 434/534.  Introduction to Geophysical Methods in Geology. 
    Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites:  OEAS 110N or 111N, and PHYS 111N-112N, or permission of the instructor.  Discussion on geophysical methods and results, including seismology, gravity, geomagnetism, geoelectricity, and radiometrics.  Laboratory includes problem assignments and a few field experiments using geophysical instruments.  Part of the laboratory hours will be used for lecturing.

  • 436/536.   Barrier Islands and Coastal Lagoons. 
    Lecture 1.5 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: OEAS 414/514.  Elementary principles of landscape, hydrography and ecology at coastal lagoons and barrier islands.  Field trips to wave and tide dominated systems.

  • 440/540.  Biological Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits.  Prerequisites: OEAS 106N-107N, 126N-127N or 306.  Marine organisms and their relationship to physical and chemical processes in the ocean. Laboratory study of local marine organisms, marine ecosystem and sampling techniques.  Includes identification, data analysis and field trips.  

  • 441-442.  Ocean and Earth Sciences Field Study I and II. 
    Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 4 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: OEAS 306 and 310, and STAT 310W or 330.  441 is prerequisite for 442.  Interdisciplinary investigation of selected sites in Southeast Virginia that includes field sampling, sample analyses, data interpretation and integration, and group report preparation and presentations.  Focuses on site selection and evaluation mapping, sampling, and sample analyses.  Oral presentations of results will be made by each student.

  • 443.  General Meteorology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  junior standing. Structure of the atmosphere; air masses, fronts, and cyclones; ice and water precipitation; hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms; introduction to modern weather forecasting; weather modification and air pollution.  Required for earth science track; not available as OEAS upper-division elective.

  • 446/546.  Quaternary Geology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: OEAS 344W.  Geological effects of Cenozoic climate changes and tectonic movements on marine and terrestrial systems.  Weekend field trips to study landscapes and deposits in the coastal plain and Appalachian provinces.  

  • 448/548.  Population Ecology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisite: MATH 211.  This course uses conceptual and mathematical models to understand how populations grow and persist in space and time. Both plants and animals are discussed. 

  • 451W.  Data Collection and Analysis in Oceanography. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: OEAS 306, 310 and MATH 211-212. This course intends to introduce the student to the basic physical oceanographic tools used to obtain and analyze information.  The student will use various oceanographic instruments to obtain data at different locations of the Chesapeake Bay.  Data obtained with these instruments will be processed and analyzed using the data analysis techniques discussed in class.  The data will then be used to answer a particular question related to the temporal and spatial variability in a natural system.

  • 455/555.  Introduction into Geomicrobiology. 
    Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits.  Prerequisites: OEAS 303.  This course explores microorganisms in marine environments and their role in the fossil record.  Students elucidate especially bacteria and protista and investigate Earth's history during the Precambrian.  One field trip.
  • 487, 488.  Honors Research in Ocean and Earth Sciences. 
    Independent studies and scheduled meetings with faculty advisor; 1-3 credits each semester.  Prerequisite:  senior standing and admission to the Academic Honors Program.  Supervised study in a field of individual interest.  Research results are reported in a public oral presentation and a thesis.

  • 495/595.  Special Topics. 
    Lectures, field and laboratory studies; 1-4 credits each semester.  Prerequisites:  junior standing and permission of the instructor.  An investigation of a selected problem in physical, geological, chemical, or biological oceanography.

  • 497.  Special Problems and Research. 
    1-3 credits.  Prerequisite: junior standing.  Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected with the direction of an instructor.